Tanzania's Largest Online Directory
Over 40,400 Listings
Subscribe to 123 Tanzania and be the first to know what's happening
Subscribe

Technology News

Wed Nov 08, 2017

WhatsApp: How the supermarket voucher scam works


The messenger app was used to send fake vouchers to people, purporting to be from trusted chains such as Asda, Tesco and Aldi.

The messages claimed to offer hundreds of pounds in savings so long as the user followed a link to an online survey asking for personal details.

The scam is a form of phishing, where fraudsters pose as reputable organisations to gain personal details.

Action Fraud, the UK's national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime, suggests anyone who has fallen victim to this scam to report it online or call 0300 123 2040.

So far, 33 people have come forward to report falling victim to the scam, although it is unclear how many people have received the message.

How does it work?

The scam works by using a link which appears almost identical to a supermarket chain's legitimate website, but with one small difference.

For example, in the screenshot above, the d in Aldi is actually a ? - a Latin character with a small dot underneath the recognisable letter.

In the tweet below, the d in Asda has been replaced with ? - another character known as a crossed D.

People who clicked the links contained in the WhatsApp messages are sent to a survey.

According to Action Fraud, the survey urges victims to hand over their financial information.

If, however, a person tries to visit the homepages for Aldi misspelled with the dotted character it sends them to an error page for a different website entirely.

Why did I get it?

Upon completing the survey, the victim is urged to send the message to 20 other contacts in order to receive a £250 voucher.

This helps legitimise the scam, says Action Fraud, as rather than being sent from a random number, the WhatsApp message comes from a trusted contact.

However, it is unclear whether users may have been compromised simply by clicking on the link, as some on social media claimed that the message was shared without their contact's consent.

A spokesperson for Action Fraud told the BBC, 'from what we can see, you would have to put certain details in to be in trouble, but it would depend on the device as all the scams are different, and some can download malware on your device.'

Action Fraud advises people to avoid unsolicited links in messages, even if they appear to come from a trusted contact.

SOURCE: BBC NEWS


Hits: 138
Posted by Arwa

Reviews

Related Products

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS

REGISTER YOUR DOMAIN NOW





IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS

Tangazo Kwa Umma
Cybercrimes Act, 2015
The Value Added Tax Act, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICE: Compliance to register and use Dot Tz (.tz) Domain names in Tanzania

LOOKING FOR A JOB?

Debt Collector
Sales & Marketing Officer
Apply for Internship Opportunities at MS TCDC in Arusha
Nurse
IT Sales and Marketing Officer
Program Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) Coordinator
Accountant
Marketing Executive
View All

THE LATEST NEWS

Android P will prevent apps from quietly hijacking your camera
AT&T will launch mobile 5G in Atlanta, Dallas and Waco
Apple rushes out fix to Telugu letter text bomb bug
AI ripe for exploitation, experts warn
Young Brits 'lack cyber-security awareness'
View All

Sponser's






Subscribe to our Newsletter



PREMIUM LISTING

Add your Company in our Premium listing

Highlight your Company here and get it viewed by Thousands of visitors

Charges are as follows:
Monthly - Tshs.20,000/-
Yearly   - Tshs.200,000/-

To put your company in our Premium Listing fill the form below:

Name is required and must be characters only.

You can pay through:
TIGO PESA - 0659 233 378
MPESA        - 0764 202 807

Sign Up X